The volume "boot" has only 0 disk space remainig

Hello! When I turn on the computer I get the error in the title.
I found a similar topic on this link, but I’m not sure about which kernels to remove, like
sudo apt-get purge linux-image-4.4.0-31-generic
and so on. My output is the following:

[email protected]:~$ dpkg --get-selections | grep "linux-image-[[:digit:]].*" | tr "\t" ";" | cut -d ";" -f1
linux-image-4.4.0-31-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-57-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-59-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-62-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-63-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-64-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-66-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-71-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-72-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-75-generic
[email protected]:~$ 

Thanks for the help!

There are a couple of ways to do this. From command-line, the first thing you need to do is find out which kernel version you’re running ;
uname -a
or
uname -r

After that, you can then purge deprecated kernels which are no longer in use.

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You only need the last one, but generally is a good idea to keep the last one and one or two more, just in case something goes wrong with the last kernel after an update.

I update my system using a script that calls

sudo apt autoremove

to keep the current kernel and one more and delete the others.

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Please see the following link -

I use synaptic to visually check the number of older kernels and images. I keep three kernels at most. HTH.

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OK thx. The command uname -r gives the output 4.4.0-75-generic.

So do I have to execute the following?

sudo apt-get purge linux-image-4.4.0-31-generic linux-image-4.4.0-57-generic linux-image-4.4.0-59-generic linux-image-4.4.0-62-generic linux-image-4.4.0-63-generic linux-image-4.4.0-64-generic linux-image-4.4.0-66-generic

I am keeping the last 3 kernels:
linux-image-4.4.0-71-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-72-generic
linux-image-4.4.0-75-generic

I don’t even know what a kernel is, so I wait for a confirmation before executing :grin:

Thank you again.

This is a fairly accessible explanation of what the linux kernel is ; http://www.tuxradar.com/content/how-linux-kernel-works

Just bear in mind most OSs have a kernel, it’s not something specific to Linux, so understanding what it is may be useful in terms of learning how things work.

If you check further up the thread, - there are a number of excellent responses and advice that will help you choose which option is most suitable for you depending on what you’re most comfortable with. I generally keep the last two kernels, but again, choose what’s right for you, and if you’re not sure, synaptic offers a gui to allow for more visual confirmation of what actions are being taken.

Good luck on your journey :slight_smile:

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