Password Manager

software

#1

Does anyone use password manager? I didn’t use to, but now I’m using pass. Anyone else uses this?

Please, share your opinions and comments about what you guys use…


#2

I like and use KeepassXC. They have an official Snap: snap install keypassxc


#3

Can it be controlled for shortening/extending the authentication session?


#4

Hmm, I’m not sure about that.


#5

I use the Lastpass browser extension (in Google Chrome)… But I’ve also heard good things about KeePassXC…


#6

I’ll add my +1 for KeePassXC. It’s saved to a local file so as long as you keep that master password strong and look after the file well. :thumbsup: I don’t use any browser extensions, I just open it when I need it.

I used LastPass at work and hated it – not only is it in the cloud but it was constantly bombarding for 2 factor authentication. The only benefit a cloud password manager has is the ability to share passwords to others “securely”.


#7

Am I only one who uses pass?! :frowning:
I don’t know, lately I’ve become more of a terminal junkey compared to what I was even six months ago! Maybe that’s why I like pass
It saves the passwords in my ~/ directory as gpg encrypted files.


#8

Also, there is anKeePass2 Pro Portable for my other Windows PC.


#9

I use Enpass, because it has an option to store the database in a cloud (Dropbox, iCloud, Google Drive, etc) and had native apps for Linux (it’s in the Ubuntu software library), Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android.

All my family use it now, including those with Macs and iPhones …

The desktop version is free and the portable versions are $10 for a lifetime licence.


#10

I use Password Safe here, merely for historical reasons (it was the only one compatible win/mac long ago); I’m considering migrating to Keepass actually, because I find PS interface isn’t efficient enough.
No password data in the cloud.
As an aside, and because I fear Google’s new usb keys may kill yet another ecosystem, I plan to buy a pair of the german Nitrokeys, the ones with storage capability, where I’ll locate my password database -indeed, as far from the cloud as I can…
H.


#11

The latest version of KeePassXC I have (2.3.3) has under database settings | encryption the ability for you to set the number of transformation rounds, and a button to benchmark how many rounds per second your machine is capable of. I didn’t really understand why it would make a difference until I tried to use it on my very under-powered phone!


#12

I am clearly missing something, the package KeePassXC package is 1.5mb.
Why would i want to do a snap install :smile: ?

$ sudo apt search keepassxc
[sudo] password: 
Sorting... Done
Full Text Search... Done
keepassxc/bionic,now 2.3.1+dfsg.1-1 amd64
  Cross Platform Password Manager

$ apt-cache --no-all-versions show keepassxc|grep -i ^size
Size: 1505072
$

#13

Because it will get updates when the app developers release them instead of waiting for the next version of Ubuntu.


#14

I am not familiar with pass.

I have gone from Lastpass to KeepassXC. So far KeepassXC does what I need.

The only problem I am having right now is syncing the database with another user profile with the appropriate rights. For some reason the database file gets corrupted with rsync.

How do you guys sync the KeepassXC database so another user on the same machine can use it as well?


#15

See, i was missing something important :innocent:
Why are they so big ? (Hidden miner :smile: )

$ snap info keepassxc
name:      keepassxc
summary:   community driven port of the windows application “Keepass Password Safe”
publisher: keepassxreboot
contact:   https://github.com/keepassxreboot/keepassxc
license:   GPL-2.0+ OR GPL-3.0+
description: |
  KeePassXC is an application for people with extremly high demands on secure
  personal data management. It has a light interface, is cross platform and
  published under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
  
  For usage tips see:
  https://github.com/keepassxreboot/keepassxc/wiki/Snap-Tips
snap-id: jf2HsR51rlftaREcwhtxiEcDc76gL4O6
channels:                    
  **stable:    2.3.3 (38) 83MB -**
  candidate: 2.3.3 (38) 83MB -
  beta:      2.3.3 (38) 83MB -
  edge:      2.3.3 (38) 83MB -
$

#16

AIUI, because they include most of the dependencies (in this case Qt libraries).


#17

ordinary installs also get immediate updates when you install them from the dev repository. I even suspect snaps, being more complex to prepare, are published after the normal upgrades on the dev repos…


#18

That’s not been my experience, at least with Snaps that are supported by the upstream developer. Snaps are maybe trickier to create the first time, but after that it’s pretty much automatic to create a new version, unless the app changes a lot. (And deb packaging isn’t simple either!) The repo’s package version depends a lot on the package maintainer and how often it gets uploaded or synced from Debian.

For Keepassxc specifically, I usually get the new Snap within a day from when a new version is released on Github. Right now, the current release is v.2.3.3, and so is the Snap, while even the cosmic package is at 2.3.1.


#19

Another +1 for Keepass or its forked projects.

I have used Keepass or KeepassXC or Keepass 2 on Windows for the last 10 years. I also don’t use the browser extensions with it because I have failed to get them to work for me, so I just open Keepass when I need to log into one of my online accounts. Local encrypted storage of my passwords has worked well for me.


#20

I do not use any password manager. It is saved in my brain. :yum:
Never looked for something like this.

Mickey :relaxed: